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Subacute Effects of Denervation on Rat Hemidiaphragm

  • C. Shindoh
  • W. Hida
  • Y. Kikuchi
  • S. Ebihara
  • T. Takishima

Abstract

Phrenic nerve damage, which is frequently the result of cervical trauma or spinal nerve diseases, may cause respiratory muscle failure. Previous studies have shown that the acetylcholine receptors on the surface of skeletal muscles increased after denervation1, and the resting membrane potential changed to depolarization within two days after denervation2. Another study showed that transformation of muscle fibers occurs in experimental hyperthyroidism, i. e., soleus (slow-twitch fiber) changes to fast and plantaris muscles (fast-twitch fiber) changes to slow within 40 days3. However, it is still unclear whether diaphragm muscle, which is a combination of fast and slow twitch muscle fiber, changes to slower or faster after denervation compared to intact diaphragm. Therefore, we examined the subacute effect of denervation on the physiological changes in muscle contractility and fatigability.

Keywords

Myosin Heavy Chain Spinal Muscular Atrophy Diaphragm Muscle Plantaris Muscle Half Relaxation Time 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Shindoh
    • 1
  • W. Hida
    • 1
  • Y. Kikuchi
    • 1
  • S. Ebihara
    • 1
  • T. Takishima
    • 1
  1. 1.First Department of Internal MedicineTohoku University School of MedicineSendaiJapan

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