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The Effect of Exercise Intensity and Duration on Ventilation during Recovery from Moderate and Heavy Exercise

  • Jason H. Mateika
  • James Duffin

Abstract

The results obtained from numerous experimental investigations suggest that the abrupt increase in ventilation (V-̇E) that is characteristic of phase 1 of constant load treadmill exercise is elicited by neural stimuli which originate from either exercising limb afferents or higher motor centers1, 2. Dejours and other investigators1, 2, 3 have proposed that these stimuli persist throughout exercise and combine in an additive fashion with humoral stimuli from the central and peripheral chemoreceptors, which may elicit the exponential increase in V-̇E that is characteristic of Phase 2, to control the steady state ventilatory response observed during Phase 3.

Keywords

Exercise Test Exercise Intensity Ventilatory Response Ventilatory Threshold American Physiological Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jason H. Mateika
    • 1
  • James Duffin
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Anesthesia and PhysiologyUniversity of TorontoOntarioCanada

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