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Recent Trends in Neuropsychological Assessment

An Overview and Update
  • Theresa Incagnoli
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

The discussion of fixed versus flexible neuropsychological batteries presented by Goldstein (Chapter 3) differs from other treatments of this topic in that the theoretical foundation underlying the fixed and flexible dimension is emphasized. It is Goldstein’s contention that the central difference underlying this dimension rests upon the theoretical foundation of what one believes rather than upon the practical consideration of what one does. The dimensional—categorical approach to neuropsychological evaluation is contingent on a dimensional as opposed to a modular brain model (Moscovitch & Nachson, 1995). Moscovitch and Nachson state that

The idea that the brain is modular is an old one, dating back at least to Gall who believed that different faculties were represented in different regions of the cortex. The opposing view, that the cortex functions as a unified whole, at least with regard to higher mental functions, has always challenged the modular one. At a deep level, the struggle between these two ideas about brain organization and function continues today. (p. 167)

Keywords

Neuropsychological Assessment Neuropsychological Test Battery Neuropsychological Examination Clinical Neuropsychologist Severe Impairment Battery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theresa Incagnoli
    • 1
  1. 1.School of MedicineState University of New YorkStony BrookUSA

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