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Socioeconomic Variation in a Late Antebellum Southern Town

The View from Archaeological and Documentary Sources
  • W. Stephen McBride
  • Kim A. McBride

Abstract

This paper looks at socioeconomic stratification as reflected in the distribution of material goods in a small, inland, antebellum community. Based on both archaeological and documentary resources, this sort of research represents one of the major strengths of historical archaeology in that it fosters comparison and integration of different types of data, allowing for a more complete picture of socioeconomic scaling and material wealth. The major goals of the paper are twofold: the first is methodological, comparing the results of artifactual and documentary approaches to the assessment of material culture consumption; and the second is more substantive, involving a general consideration of socioeconomic stratification, its nature in antebellum southern society, and relationships between social structure and material culture and its consumption.

Keywords

Material Culture Socioeconomic Variation House Site Historical Archaeology Archaeological Investigation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Stephen McBride
    • 1
  • Kim A. McBride
    • 1
  1. 1.Museum and Department of AnthropologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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