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The Use of Converging Lines of Evidence for Determining Socioeconomic Status

  • Patrick H. Garrow

Abstract

The trash deposits encountered within an historic site may be viewed as the end products of a series of purchase-use-discard incidents that took place during the occupation of that site. Under this approach, each step in this process represents distinct and measurable choices made by the individuals who generated the archaeological record under study. Each category of materials that entered the household (either by purchase or other means), that was used within the household, and that was subsequently lost or discarded (when no longer deemed useful), has the potential to reflect specific types of information about that household.

Keywords

Historical Research Faunal Analysis Faunal Material King Street Faunal Collection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick H. Garrow
    • 1
  1. 1.Garrow & AssociatesAtlantaUSA

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