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Information Based Limits on Synaptic Growth in Hebbian Models

  • Allan Gottschalk

Abstract

Hebb’s seminal concept that synaptic strength varies as a function of correlated pre- and post-synaptic activity has impacted pharmacologic, physiologic, and computational models of the nervous system [Hebb, 1949]. Specifically, he proposed that correlated pre- and post-synaptic activity leads to an increase in synaptic strength. When computational models incorporate Hebbian synapses, some limit must be placed on synaptic growth if well-defined solutions are to be produced, and it may be necessary to incorporate some means by which synaptic strength can also decrease. Strategies to limit synaptic growth have included some type of limit on individual or total synaptic size. Another approach incorporates a computationally [Bienenstock, Cooper, and Munro, 1982] motivated “sliding threshold” for synaptic modification where the sliding threshold is stimulus dependant.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allan Gottschalk
    • 1
  1. 1.University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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