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A Special Role for Input Codes in Solving the Transverse Patterning Problem

  • Xiangbao Wu
  • Joanna M. Tyrcha
  • William B. Levy

Abstract

Rats require a hippocampus to solve the transverse patterning problem. Here, a hippocampal model also solves this configural learning problem. The problem is hard: A learning paradigm, called progressive learning, is required. It is required by rats, humans, and the model. Second, input patterns within a sequence must be repeated. Such repetition increases the statistical dependence, a surprising observation if you assume statistical dependence is undesirable. Such repetition of the same patterns in a sequence facilitates the formation of local context neuronal firings. These neuronal firings are critical, and we hypothesize that they are analogous to place cells found in behaving animals.

Keywords

Local Context Input Sequence Input Pattern Stimulus Pair Place Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiangbao Wu
    • 1
  • Joanna M. Tyrcha
    • 1
  • William B. Levy
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurological SurgeryUniversity of Virginia Health Sciences CenterCharlottesvilleUSA

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