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Adaptive Resonance in V1–V2 Interaction

Grouping, Illusory Contours, and RF-Organization
  • Heiko Neumann
  • Wolfgang Sepp
  • Petra Mössner

Abstract

A model for visual cortical boundary detection and contour grouping is proposed that takes into account the structure and functionality of the primate visual system. The architecture relates to visual cortical areas V1 and V2 which are bidirectionally interconnected via feedforward as well as feedback projections. It is suggested that their functionality is primarily determined by the measurement and integration of signal features that are continuously matched against neural codes of expectancies generated on the basis of long-range integration of compatible arrangements of initial measurements. Feedforward signal detection and the generation of feedback expectances is dedicated to different visual layers or areas. Thus, the bidirectional interaction between cortical areas can be understood as an active and continuing mechanism for the prediction and selection of elements in the visual input data stream. The net effect produces contour grouping and illusory contour completion as well as context-sensitive shaping in the tuning of orientation selective cells.

Keywords

Bipole Cell Input Activation Illusory Contour Orientation Selectivity Adaptive Resonance Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heiko Neumann
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Sepp
    • 1
  • Petra Mössner
    • 1
  1. 1.Fakultät für Informatik Abt. Neuroinformatik Oberer EselsbergUniversität UlmUlmGermany

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