Advertisement

Abstract

The behavioral and the psychodynamic perspectives are the two major approaches in psychotherapy Each perspective provides both strengths and weaknesses in resolving psychopathology It seems evident that if the proper combination of the two could be found, such a hybrid would yield a more effective psychotherapy than would either taken alone. One major step in formulating this integration of the therapies is to provide some systematic method for determining when the concepts, strategies, and tactics of one perspective should dominate and when those of the other perspective should be the main guide to the therapeutic process. Behavioral psychotherapy (BP) attempts to provide just such a systematic method.

Keywords

Chronic Depression Childhood Memory Assertive Behavior Behavioral Organization Behavioral Psychotherapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aronson, L. R., Tobach, E., Rosenblatt, J. S., & Lehrman, D. S. (Eds.). (1972). Selected writings of T. C. Schneirla. San Francisco: W. H. Freeman.Google Scholar
  2. Fensterheim, H. (1972). The initial interview. In A. A. Lazarus (Ed.), Clinical behavior therapy (pp. 22–40). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  3. Fensterheim, H. (1975). The case of Marion: Behavior therapy approach. In C. A. Loew, H. Grayson, & G. H. Loew (Eds.), Three psychotherapies (pp. 41–59). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  4. Fensterheim, H. (1981). Clinical behavior therapy of depression. In J. Clarkin & H. Glazer (Eds.), Depression: Behavioral and directive intervention strategies (pp. 205–228). New York: Garland Press.Google Scholar
  5. Fensterheim, H. (1983). The behavioral psychotherapy model of phobias. In H. Fensterheim & H. I. Glazer (Eds.), Behavioral psychotherapy: Basic principles and case studies in an integrative clinical model (pp. 22–39). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  6. Fensterheim, H. (1989). Commentary: Integrating behavioral and psychodynamic therapies. Journal of Integrative Eclectic Psychotherapy, 8, 121–124.Google Scholar
  7. Fensterheim, H., & Glazer, H. I. (1983). Behavioral psychotherapy: Basic principles and case studies in an integrative clinical model. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  8. Fensterheim, H., & Kantor, J. S. (1980). The behavioral approach to sexual disorders. In B. B. Wolman & J. Money (Eds.), Handbook of human sexuality (pp. 313–324). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
  9. Fitz-Patrick, M. M., & Weber, C. K. (1989). Integrative approaches in psychotherapy: Combining psychodynamics and behavioral treatments. Journal of Integrative Eclectic Psychotherapy, 8, 102–117.Google Scholar
  10. Haynes, S. N., & O’Brien, W. H. (1990). Functional analysis in behavior therapy. Clinical Psychology Review, 10, 649–668.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Jacobson, M. E. (1983). Behavioral psychotherapy of obsessional checking: Treatment through the relationship. In H. Fensterheim & H. I. Glazer (Eds.), Behavioral psychotherapy: Basic principles and case studies in an integrative clinical model (pp. 91–108). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  12. Maletzky, B. M. (1980). Assisted covert sensitization. In D. J. Cox & R. J. Daitzman (Eds.), Exhibitionism: Description, assessment and treatment (pp. 187–252). New York: Garland Press.Google Scholar
  13. Salter, A. (1949). Conditioned reflex therapy. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.Google Scholar
  14. Shapiro, F. (1989). Efficacy of the eye movement desensitization procedure in the treatment of traumatic memories. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 2, 199–223.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Wilson, D. G. (1972). Function. In H. J. Eyesenck, W Arnold, & B. Meili (Eds.), Encyclopedia of psychology (Volume 1, p. 394). New York: Herder & Herder.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Herbert Fensterheim
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryThe New York Hospital-Cornell Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

Personalised recommendations