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An Integrative Approach to the Psychotherapy of the Elderly

  • Nicholas Papouchis
  • Vicki Passman

Abstract

The focus of this chapter will be to present an integrative approach to individual psychotherapy with the elderly patient. The theoretical basis for this approach is best understood from an object relational position which emphasizes the individual’s relationships with significant figures in one’s life as the basis for psychopathology. The approach relies heavily on attachment theory derived from John Bowlby’s three volume work on Attachment and Loss (1973, 1980, 1982), and Mary Ainsworth’s (1978) empirical strategies to studying this phenomena. From Bowlby’s perspective, loss is a central factor in determining psychopathology. To the extent that aging involves the experience of loss in a number of arenas of psychic life, whether personal (physical), interpersonal (loss of spouse or family and friends), or social (occupational or financial), it is a crucial determinant of how the aging process is experienced.

Keywords

Therapeutic Relationship Secure Attachment Attachment Theory Geriatric Psychiatry Part Versus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicholas Papouchis
    • 1
  • Vicki Passman
    • 1
  1. 1.Doctoral Program in Clinical PsychologyLong Island UniversityBrooklynUSA

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