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An Integrated Approach to the Treatment of Anxiety Disorders and Phobias

  • Jerold R. Gold

Abstract

Anxiety is a human experience which many assume is universal. Excessive or inappropriate “amounts” or overly frequent occurrences of this state, in its biopsychologically pure form or in the form of anxiety-based symptoms, have been the concern of all schools of psychotherapy since the field was born. Phobias and anxiety disorders often have been at the center of fierce disputes, controversies, and battles between therapists of one sectarian approach or another. Such acrimonious debates go back as far as the “Little Hans” and “Little Albert” discussions (Freud, 1909; Watson & Reyner, 1920), in which the psychoanalytic and behavioral theories of phobic etiology first were described as mutually exclusive. As behavior therapy developed as a viable alternative to analytic and humanistic therapies, the disorders which were taken as its testing ground were phobias and anxiety.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Attachment Theory Cognitive Restructuring Specific Disorder Anxious Attachment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerold R. Gold
    • 1
  1. 1.Doctoral Program in Clinical PsychologyLong Island UniversityBrooklynUSA

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