Empirical Research on Integrative and Eclectic Psychotherapies

  • Carol R. Glass
  • Brian J. Victor
  • Diane B. Arnkoff

Abstract

In his recent chapter on the history of psychotherapy integration, Arkowitz (1992b) reviews a large number of articles and books on integration that have made significant theoretical and clinical contributions. In contrast, empirical evaluations of these ideas have lagged behind. He argues that until research on the effectiveness of integrative treatments and tests of hypotheses derived from integrative theories are carried out, the promise of these new approaches will remain unfulfilled.

Keywords

Obesity Depression Expense Smoke Tate 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol R. Glass
    • 1
  • Brian J. Victor
    • 1
  • Diane B. Arnkoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCatholic University of AmericaUSA

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