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A “Social” Clinical Theory of Therapy

Integrating Social and Clinical Psychology
  • Rebecca Curtis

Abstract

Why yet another theory of therapy? With at least 250 such theories, we certainly do not need another one. Yet another theory appears to have emerged, needed or not. From a speciality within philosophy, psychology has grown into at least three subdisciplines. One, modeling itself after the natural sciences, includes behaviorism and behavior therapies. A second, social psychology, attempts to understand people and their relationships and uses the tools of social science. The third, situating itself with the humanities, draws upon the wisdom of poets and the arts of charismatic leaders and healers. Psychoanalysis and several other therapies are in this third subdiscipline. A “social” clinical psychology tries to integrate these three psychologies.

Keywords

Goal Attainment Psychoanalytic Theory Mortality Salience Person Schema Nontraditional Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rebecca Curtis
    • 1
  1. 1.Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological StudiesAdelphi UniversityGarden CityUSA

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