Advertisement

The Sociohistorical Context of Psychotherapy Integration

  • Jerold R. Gold

Abstract

This handbook collects in one place a significant sampling of the most current and important work in psychotherapy integration. Psychotherapy integration is a subspeciality of the ongoing clinical, theoretical, and empirical scholarship in the general areas of psychotherapeutic process, technique, and outcome. It is a specialization and a field of inquiry with a relatively short but highly controversial history. Psychotherapy integration is both a set of ideas and theories and a group of technical procedures and innovations which arise from such academic and scholastic pursuits. In the last decade, the investigation of such constructs and methods of practice has moved from the fringes of respectability and clinical awareness to assume a more legitimate and prominent place in the broader fields of psychotherapeutic research and practice.

Keywords

Behavior Therapy Comparative Ther Therapy Integration Psychotherapy Integration Psychotherapeutic Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alexander, F. (1963). The dynamics of psychotherapy in the light of learning theory. American Journal of Psychiatry, 120, 440–448.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Alexander, E, & French, T. (1946). Psychoanalytic therapy. New York: Ronald Press.Google Scholar
  3. Arkowitz, H. (1984). Historical perspective on the integration of psychoanalytic therapy and behavioral therapy. In H. Arkowitz & S. Messer (Eds.), Psychoanalytic therapy and behavioral therapy: Is integration possible? (pp. 1–30). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Arkowitz, H. (1991). Introductory statement: Psychotherapy integration comes of age. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 1, 1–4.Google Scholar
  5. Arkowitz, H., & Messer, S. (Eds.). (1984). Psychoanalytic therapy and behavioral therapy: Is integration possible? New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bergin, A. E. (1968). Technique for improving desensitization via warmth, empathy, and emotional reexperiencing of hierarchy events. In R. Rubin & C. M. Franks (Eds.), Advances in behavior therapy (pp. 20–33). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  7. Birk, L. (1970). Behavior therapy: Integration with dynamic therapy. Behavior Therapy, 1, 522–526.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Birk, L., & Brinkley-Birk, A. (1974). Psychoanalysis and behavior therapy. American Journal of Psychiatry, 131, 499–510.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Brady, J. P (1968). Psychotherapy by combined behavioral and dynamic approaches. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 9, 536–543.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Dollard, J., & Miller, N. E. (1950). Personality and psychotherapy. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  11. Feather, B. W., & Rhoades, J. M. (1972a). Psychodynamic behavior therapy: I. Theory and practice. Archives of General Psychiatry, 26, 496–502.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Feather, B. W., & Rhoades, J. M. (1972b). Psychodynamic behavior therapy: II. Clinical aspects. Archives of General Psychiatry, 26, 503–511.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Fiedler, F. E. (1950). The concept of an ideal therapeutic relationship. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 14, 239–245.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Frank, J. D. (1959). Persuasion and healing. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Franks, C. M. (1984). On conceptual and technical integrity in psychoanalysis and behavior therapy: Two incompatible systems. In H. Arkowitz & S. Messer (Eds.), Psychoanalytic therapy and behavioral therapy: Is integration possible? (pp. 223–248). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. French, T. M. (1933). Interrelations between psychoanalysis and the experimental work of Pavlov. American Journal of Psychiatry, 89, 1165–1203.Google Scholar
  17. Freud, S. (1909). Notes upon a case of obsessional neurosis. In J. Strachey (Ed. and Trans.), The Standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (Vol. 10, pp. 153–318). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  18. Gold, J. (1990). Culture, history, and psychotherapy integration. Journal of Integrative and Eclectic Psychotherapy, 9, 41–48.Google Scholar
  19. Goldfried, M., & Davison, G. (1976). Clinical behavior therapy. New York: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston.Google Scholar
  20. Goldfried, M., & Newman, C. (1986). Psychotherapy integration: An historical perspective. In J. C. Norcross (Ed.), Handbook of eclectic psychotherapy (pp.). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  21. Hull, C. E. (1952). A behavior system. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Ischlondy, N. E. (1930). Neuropsyche und Hirnride: Bank II. Physiologische Grundlagen der Tiefenpsychologie unter besonder Berucksichting der Psychoanalyse. Berlin: Urban and Schwarzenberg. Cited in Arkowitz, 1984.Google Scholar
  23. Klein, G. S. (1971). Psychoanalytic therapy: An exploration of essentials. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  24. Kubie, L. S. (1934). Relation of the conditioned reflex to psychoanalytic technique. Archives of Neurology and Psychiatry, 32, 1137–1142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Kuhn, T. S. (1962). The structure of scientific revolutions. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  26. Lazarus, A. (1989). The practice of multimodal therapy. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  27. London, P. (1964). The modes and morals of psychotherapy. New York: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston.Google Scholar
  28. Marks, I. M., & Gelder, M. G. (1966). Common ground between behavior therapy and psychodynamic methods. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 39, 11–23.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Marmor, J. (1971). Dynamic psychotherapy and behavior therapy: Are they reconcilable? Archives of General Psychiatry, 24, 22–28.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Messer, S. B. (1984). The integration of psychoanalytic therapy and behavior therapy: Summing up. In H. Arkowitz & S. Messer (Eds.), Psychoanalytic therapy and behavior therapy: Is integration possible? New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  31. Sears, R. R. (1944). Experimental analysis of psychoanalytic phenomena. In J. McV. Hunt (Ed.), Personality and the behavior disorders (pp. 191–206). New York: Ronald Press.Google Scholar
  32. Shoben, E. J. (1949). Psychotherapy as a problem in learning theory. Psychological Bulletin, 46, 366–392.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Sloane, R. B. (1969). The converging paths of behavior therapy and psychotherapy American Journal of Psychiatry, 125, 877–885.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  34. Wachtel, P. L. (1977). Psychoanalysis and behavior therapy: Towards an integration. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  35. Weitzman, B. (1967). Behavior therapy and psychotherapy. Psychological Review, 74, 300–317.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Wolpe, J. (1984). Behavior therapy according to Lazarus. American Psychologist, 39, 1326–1327.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerold R. Gold
    • 1
  1. 1.Doctoral Program in Clinical PsychologyLong Island UniversityBrooklynUSA

Personalised recommendations