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Cognitive Therapy with the Adult Depressed Patient

  • Carlo Perris

Abstract

Cognitive therapy, as originally conceived and developed during the last few decades by Beck and his associates (Beck, 1967, 1970, 1976, 1982, 1986; Beck et al., 1979a; Bedrosian & Beck, 1980; Emery, 1981; Freeman, 1983; Freeman & Greenwood, 1987; Kovacs & Beck, 1978; Young & Beck, 1982), has rapidly become an established psychotherapeutic method of treatment for depressive disorders. It has been demonstrated to be as effective in treating moderate to severe depressive syndromes as are the most frequently used antidepressant drugs. Its popularity as a therapeutic tool rests on substantial experimental documentation gathered in several controlled trials (see Blackburn, 1988, for a recent review).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlo Perris
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of UmeaUmeaSweden

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