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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

  • Constance V. Dancu
  • Edna B. Foa

Abstract

Rape is a traumatic event often followed by emotional reactions that can severely disrupt daily functioning. The responses following rape have been labeled posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a relatively new diagnostic entity that was introduced in the DSM-III as an anxiety disorder (American Psychiatric Association, 1980). In the revised manual (DSM-III-R; American Psychiatric Association, 1987), the characteristic symptoms of the disorder were divided into three classes: (a) reexperiencing of the traumatic event (e.g., nightmares, flashbacks, intense emotional distress when exposed to reminders of the trauma); (b) avoidance and numbing (e.g., avoidance of thoughts and reminders of the trauma, psychogenic amnesia, detachment); and (c) increased arousal (e.g., sleep disturbance, trouble concentrating, hypervigilance, exaggerated startle response, physiologic reactivity upon exposure to events that resemble the traumatic event).

Keywords

Traumatic Event Intrusive Thought Rape Victim Chronic Ptsd Sexual Assault Victim 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Constance V. Dancu
    • 1
  • Edna B. Foa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Center for the Treatment and Study of AnxietyMedical College of Pennsylvania/EPPIPhiladelphiaUSA

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