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Multiple Personality Disorder

  • Catherine G. Fine

Abstract

Long believed to be a rare and apocryphal psychiatric condition (Klutf, 1987), multiple personality disorder (MPD) is presently understood as a relatively common but often misdiagnosed syndrome. Putnam, Guroff, Silberman, Barban, and Post (1986), in a study of 100 MPD patients, found that the average MPD patient is correctly diagnosed only about seven years after initial mental health assessment for symptoms referable to MPD. During that time frame, he or she can expect to receive an average of 3.6 erroneous diagnoses. These misdiagnoses have as much to do with graduate training programs, Hollywoodian perceptions, and overt skepticism about a disorder (Dell, 1988) that carries with it supposed flamboyant and attention-seeking behaviors (though this type of presentation occurs in only 6% of the cases; Kluft, 1985) as it does with MPD patients’ decided attempts to dissimulate or deny their condition (Kluft 1985, 1987) to their therapists and to themselves. MPD is a condition of secrecy; if the presentation were truly overt, delay in diagnosis would be the exception rather than the rule (Kluft & Fine, 1989).

Keywords

Cognitive Therapy Cognitive Dissonance Cognitive Distortion Cognitive Therapist Double Bind 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine G. Fine
    • 1
  1. 1.The Institute of Pennsylvania HospitalPhiladelphiaUSA

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