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Schizophrenic Disorders

  • Carlo Perris
  • Gullan Nordström
  • Louise Troeng

Abstract

Cognitive-behavioral therapy has been applied to a broad range of patient problems, mostly of the neurotic type, including depression, anxiety, phobia, and panic. The application of cognitive therapy to the more chronic and serious schizophrenic disorders has been a far more recent development (Perris, 1988, 1989). Because of the genetic and neurochemical elements of schizophrenia, “talking therapy” has not been seen as a prime component of therapy for this large and quite diverse group. It can, however, be a central part of a comprehensive treatment program including hospitalization during acute phases, aftercare living arrangements, outpatient medication, individual and group therapy, and vocational counseling.

Keywords

Schizophrenic Disorder Cognitive Therapy Therapy Session Vocational Rehabilitation Coffee Break 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Readings

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  7. Perris, C. (1989). Cognitive therapy and the schizophrenic disorders. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlo Perris
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gullan Nordström
    • 3
  • Louise Troeng
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUmeå University HospitalUmeåSweden
  2. 2.WHO Collaboration Center for Research and Training in Mental HealthUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  3. 3.Ersboda Cognitive Treatment CenterUmeåSweden

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