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Poststroke Depression

  • Mary R. Hibbard
  • Susan E. Grober
  • Paula N. Stein
  • Wayne A. Gordon

Abstract

As medical technology advances, survival rates from stroke are steadily improving. There are over 1 million stroke survivors in this country (National Center for Health Statistics, 1977). Combining this statistic with the rapid “graying” of the American society, the rehabilitation community has begun to focus attention on providing a broader range of interventions for stroke survivors. Despite the fact that the majority of stroke patients are depressed (Gordon, Hibbard, Egelko, et al., 1990; Robinson et al., 1983; Ruckdeschel-Hibbard, Gordon, & Diller, 1986), traditional rehabilitation efforts have focused largely on the physical and language losses following stroke. Thus, poststroke depression (PSD) presents as a major impediment to maximizing the quality of life for stroke survivors.

Keywords

Stroke Patient Cognitive Therapy Stroke Survivor Outpatient Rehabilitation Poststroke Depression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Gordon, W. A., Hibbard, M. R., Egelko, S., Riley, F., Simon, D., Diller, L., Ross, E. D., & Lieberman, A. N. (1990). Issues in the diagnosis of post-stroke depression. Rehabilitation Psychology, 36(2), 71–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Suggested Readings

  1. Beck, A., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B., & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  2. Gordon, W. A., Hibbard, M. R., Egelko, S., Riley, F., Simon, D., Diller, L., Ross, E. D., & Lieberman, A. N. (1990). Issues in the diagnosis of post-stroke depression. Rehabilitation Psychology, 36(2), 71–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Hibbard, M. R., Gordon, W. A., Egelko, S., & Langer, K. (1986). Issues in the diagnosis and cognitive therapy of depression in brain damaged individuals. In A. Freeman & V. Greenwood (Eds.), Cognitive therapy applications in psychiatric and medical settings (pp. 183–198). New York: Human Sciences Press.Google Scholar
  4. Hibbard, M. R., Grober, S. E., Gordon, W. A., & Aletta, E. G. (1990). Modifications of cognitive psychotherapy for the treatment of post-stroke depression. Behavioral Therapist, 13, 15–17.Google Scholar
  5. Hibbard, M. R., Grober, S. E., Gordon, W. A., Aletta, E. G., & Freeman, A. (1990). Cognitive therapy and the treatment of post-stroke depression. Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation, 5, 43–55.Google Scholar
  6. Hibbard, M. R., Gordon, W. A., Stein, P. S., Grober, S., & Sliwinski, M. (in press). A multimodal approach to the diagnosis of post-stroke depression. In W. A. Gordon (Ed.), Advances in stroke rehabilitation. Andover, MA: Andover Publishers, Inc.Google Scholar
  7. Stein, P N., Gordon, W. A., Hibbard, M. R., & Sliwinski, M. (1992). An examination of depression in the spouses of stroke patients. Rehabilitation Psychology, 37(2), 121–130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary R. Hibbard
    • 1
  • Susan E. Grober
    • 2
  • Paula N. Stein
    • 1
  • Wayne A. Gordon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Rehabilitation MedicineThe Mount Sinai Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Section of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationNorwalk HospitalNorwalkUSA

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