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Combined Cognitive Therapy and Pharmacotherapy of Depression

  • Jesse H. Wright

Abstract

Cognitive therapy and pharmacotherapy have originated from competing etiological theories of mental disorders. However, they are lrequently used together in treatment of a wide variety of clinical conditions (Wright, 1987; Wright & Schrodt, 1989). This case report will illustrate how different forms of therapy can complement one another in the treatment of severe depression.

Keywords

Bipolar Disorder Beck Depression Inventory Cognitive Therapy Homework Assignment Automatic Thought 
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References

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Suggested Readings

  1. Rush, A. J. (1988). Cognitive approaches to adherence. In A. J. Frances & R. E. Hales (Eds.), The American Psychiatric Press review of psychiatry (vol. 7). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar
  2. Wright, J. H. (1987). Cognitive therapy and medication as combined treatment. In A. Freeman & V. Greenwood (Eds.), Cognitive therapy: Applications in psychiatric and medical settings. New York: Human Sciences Press.Google Scholar
  3. Wright, J. H., & Beck, A. T. (1983). Cognitive therapy of depression: Theory and practice. Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 34(12), 1119–1127.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Wright, J. H., & Schrodt, G. R. Jr. (1989). Combined cognitive therapy and pharmacotherapy. In A. Freeman, M. D. Simon, H. Arkowitz, & L. Beutler (Eds.), Handbook of cognitive therapy. New York: Plenum.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jesse H. Wright
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Louisville School of MedicineLouisvilleUSA
  2. 2.Norton Psychiatric ClinicLouisvilleUSA

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