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Abstract

Hypnosis is a multifaceted adjunct treatment that is useful in overcoming a wide variety of psychological disorders. However, it should be emphasized that hypnosis is an adjunct procedure only, and is not by itself a therapy (Dowd & Healy, 1986). Thus, hypnosis should always be integrated within a more general psychological treatment plan and should not be used alone. For that reason, I will refer to the psychological procedures described in this chapter as hypnotherapy.

Keywords

Adjunct Procedure Cognitive Psychotherapy Developmental Antecedent Clinical Hypnosis Psychological Procedure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Beck, A. T. (1976). Cognitive therapy and the emotional disorders. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bowers, K. S. (1976). Hypnosis for the seriously curious. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
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Suggested Readings

  1. Crasilneck, H. B., & Hall, J. A. (1985). Clinical hypnosis: Principles and applications. New York: Grune & Stratton.Google Scholar
  2. Dowd, E. T., & Healy, J. M. (1986). Case studies in hypnotherapy. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  3. Golden, W. L., Dowd, E. T., & Friedberg, F. (1987). Hypnotherapy: A modern approach. New York: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  4. Wester, W C., & Smith, A. H. (1984). Clinical hypnosis: A multidisciplinary approach. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Thomas Dowd
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyKent State UniversityKentUSA

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