Advertisement

Abstract

When Aaron T. Beck first began to conceptualize his new therapy, he applied it to that most common of human conditions and clinical treatment problems, depression (Beck, 1966). As his ideas crystallized over the next decade, he refined the theory and therapy as it applied to the broad range of clinical problems (Beck, 1976). As a result of his weekly clinical meetings with the staff of the Center for Cognitive Therapy, a treatment manual for the treatment of depression grew organically. Starting as a mimeographed booklet of several pages, it eventually became the “treatment manual” that evolved into the now-classic Cognitive Therapy of Depression (Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery, 1979). Over the past decade, Beck and his colleagues have addressed the cognitive therapy treatment of other clinical problems, such as anxiety (Beck, Emery, & Greenberg, 1985) and personality disorders (Beck, Freeman, & Associates, 1990). Depression has, however, been the clinical problem that has been most studied in terms of treatment efficacy (Rush, Beck, Kovacs, & Hollon, 1977; Blackburn, Bishop, Glen, Whalley, & Christie, 1981; Murphy, Simons, Wetzel, & Lustman, 1984).

Keywords

Body Image Suicidal Ideation Personality Disorder Cognitive Therapy Negative Thought 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Beck, A. T. (1966). Depression: Causes and treatment. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
  2. Beck, A. T. (1976). Cognitive therapy and the emotional disorders,. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  3. Beck, A. T., Emery, G., & Greenberg, R. L. (1985). Anxiety and phobia: A cognitive perspective. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  4. Beck, A. T., Freeman, A., & Associates. (1990). Cognitive therapy of personality disorders. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  5. Beck, A. T., Kovacs, M., & Weissman, A. (1979). Assessment of suicidal ideation: The Scale of Suicidal Ideation. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 47, 343–352.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Beck, A. T., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B. F., & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  7. Blackburn, I. M., Bishop, S., Glen, A. I. M., Whalley, L. J., & Christie, J. E. (1981). The efficacy of cognitive therapy in depression: A treatment using cognitive therapy and pharmacotherapy, each alone and in combination. British Journal of Psychiatry, 139, 181–189.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Bowers, W. (1989). Cognitive therapy with inpatients. In A. Freeman, K. M. Simon, L. E. Beutler, & H. Arkowitz, Comprehensive handbook of cognitive therapy (pp. 583–596). New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Coche, E. (1987). Problem-solving training: A cognitive group therapy modality. In A. Freeman & V. Greenwood (Eds.), Cognitive therapy: Applications in psychiatric and medical settings (pp. 83–102). New York: Human Sciences Press.Google Scholar
  10. Freeman, A., & Greenwood, V. (Eds.). (1987). Cognitive therapy: Applications in psychiatric and medical settings. New York: Human Sciences Press.Google Scholar
  11. Greenwood, V. (1983). Cognitive therapy with the young adult chronic patient. In A. Freeman (Ed.), Cognitive therapy with couples and groups (pp. 183–198). New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Grossman, R. W., & Freet, B. (1987). A cognitive approach to group therapy with hospitalized adolescents. In A. Freeman & V. Greenwood (Eds.), Cognitive therapy: Applications in psychiatric and medical settings (pp. 132–154). New York: Human Sciences Press.Google Scholar
  13. Murphy, G. E., Simons, A. D., Wetzel, R. D., & Lustman, P. J. (1984). Cognitive therapy versus tricyclic medication in the treatment of major depression. Archives of General Psychiatry, 41, 33–41.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Perris, C., Rodhe, K., Palm, A., Abelson, M., Hellgren, S., Lilja, C. & Soderman, H. (1987). Fully integrated in-and outpatient services in a psychiatric sector: Implementation of a new model for the care of psychiatric patients favoring continuity of care. In A. Freeman & V. Greenwood (Eds.), Cognitive therapy: Applications in psychiatric and medical settings (pp. 117–131). New York: Human Sciences Press.Google Scholar
  15. Rush, A. J., Beck, A. T., Kovacs, M., & Hollon, S. (1977). Comparative efficacy of cognitive therapy and imipramine in the treatment of depressed outpatients. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 1, 17–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Schrodt, G. R., & Wright, J. H. (1987). In A. Freeman & V. Greenwood (Eds.), Cognitive therapy: Applications in psychiatric and medical settings (pp. 69–82). New York: Human Sciences Press.Google Scholar
  17. Wright, J. H., & Schrodt, G. R. (1989). Combined cognitive therapy and pharmacotherapy. In A. Freeman, K. M. Simon, L. E. Beutler, & H. Arkowitz (Eds.), Comprehensive handbook of cognitive therapy (pp. 267–282). New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Suggested Readings

  1. Freeman, A., Epstein, N., & Simon, K. M. (Eds.). (1986). Depression in the family. New York: Haworth.Google Scholar
  2. Freeman, A., Pretzer, J., Fleming, B., & Simon, K. M. (1990). Clinical applications of cognitive therapy. New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur Freeman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryCooper Hospital/ University Medical Center and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at CamdenCamdenUSA

Personalised recommendations