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An Adjustment Disorder

  • Mark Gilson

Abstract

A 30-year history of cognitive therapy theory followed by a significant body of treatment research has given the practitioner credible and effective paths to conceptualize and remedy mood disorders (Beck, 1961, 1963, 1967; Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery, 1979; Ellis, 1962). This may be especially true for the client who is dealing with emotional problems associated with adjusting to demanding changes in life. The cognitive model promotes a collaboration with patients in defining problems in their own terms and using common sense to change thinking and to manage those problems (Beck, 1976; Beck et al., 1979). The therapist’s role in this model of treatment is to work with clients’ conscious ideas and to enhance or modify thought patterns and coping techniques to restore or improve functioning.

Keywords

Depressed Mood Cognitive Therapy Activity Schedule Beck Anxiety Inventory Adjustment Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Suggested Readings

  1. Peck, M. S. (1978). The road less traveled. New York: Simon & Schuster.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Gilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Atlanta Center for Cognitive TherapyAtlantaUSA

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