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Auditory Problems in Children

  • Annette R. Zaner
  • Janet M. Purn

Abstract

Compared with other handicapping conditions, the incidence of handicapping hearing impairment in young children is relatively low. Nevertheless, children with auditory deficits are prominent among those for whom “education” in early infancy is deemed essential. Indeed, early identification and intervention strategies for hearing-impaired youngsters are thought to be so critical for adequate development that proposals for innovative approaches with this population were among the first to be encouraged by grants from the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. In fact, services for infants with hearing impairments were considered such a high priority that the United States granting agencies suggested that no minimum age be specified for including hearing-impaired children in intervention programs. On recommendation from professional consultants, it was strongly urged that “age of identification,” rather than chronological age, be considered as the appropriate date for enrollment.

Keywords

Hearing Loss Cochlear Nucleus Hearing Disorder Eustachian Tube Function Mixed Hearing Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annette R. Zaner
    • 1
  • Janet M. Purn
    • 1
  1. 1.The Mount Carmel GuildNewarkUSA

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