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Articulation—Organic Factors

  • A. C. Nichols

Abstract

Historically, the most common explanations by laymen and physicians for articulation disorders have involved organic factors. In the past fifty to one hundred years, a change in professional opinion has led authorities to assert that articulation disorders are psychologically based, learned phenomena (Milisen, 1954; Winitz, 1977). While it is currently acknowledged that articulation defects may have both organic and functional origins, few experimental studies involve appropriate controls for both factors. It is rare, for example, to find the tactile sensitivity of the tongue controlled in an articulation-learning study, or stimulatability controlled in a study of the articulation of the apraxic. Hence, a philosophical bias or experimental artifact based upon the investigator’s theoretical position has led to a curiously dichotomized clinical approach to articulation problems.

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy Cleft Palate Deaf Child Voice Onset Time Articulation Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. C. Nichols
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Speech PathologySan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA

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