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Entitlements, Payees, and Coercion

  • Suzan Hurley Cogswell
Part of the The Springer Series in Social Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) programs provide financial support to persons who meet income or other eligibility criteria.1 If a person who qualifies for payment under either entitlement program is unable to manage funds or does not maintain a permanent mailing address, an individual or organization is appointed “payee” to receive monthly benefits on the person’s behalf (Social Security Act, 1935).

Keywords

Homeless Person Mental Health Agency Supplemental Security Income Money Management Housing Choice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suzan Hurley Cogswell
    • 1
  1. 1.Legislative Office of Education OversightColumbusUSA

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