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Outpatient Commitment

Official Coercion in the Community
  • Virginia Aldigé Hiday
Part of the The Springer Series in Social Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Coerced mental health treatment in the community that is mandated by court order is known as outpatient commitment. This official mandatory mental health treatment in the community grew out of the 1960s and 1970s civil rights reform of mental health law when basic principles of due process and protection of individual liberties were applied to mental patients (Chambers, 1972; Hiday & Goodman, 1982; LaFond & Durham, 1992). Interpreting the Constitution as requiring a state to use the least drastic means when basic liberty is at stake (Shelton . Tucker, 1960), both state statutes and federal appellate courts called for application of the least restrictive alternative in civil commitment cases.1

Keywords

Mental Health Center Court Order Civil Commitment Conditional Release Outpatient Commitment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Virginia Aldigé Hiday
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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