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Chemoreception and Conduction Systems in Sea Anemones

  • I. D. Lawn

Abstract

In an earlier review of reception in Cnidaria, Ross (1966) stressed the supreme importance of chemoreception: “If we are to understand the behaviour of these animals we must recognize the primacy of chemoreception in determing what they do.” Much effort has been directed towards the identification of the chemical activators involved in certain responses, especially feeding behaviour ( see review by Lindstedt, 1971). These studies have relied heavily on assays in which behavioural observations have been utilized as the measured output of the sensory response.

Keywords

Sensory Response Conduction System Hermit Crab Molluscan Shell Alarm Pheromone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. D. Lawn
    • 1
  1. 1.BamfieldCanada

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