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Individual Intellectual Assessment

  • Alan S. Kaufman
  • Patti L. Harrison
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Psychologists use intelligence tests for a wide variety of purposes. Diagnosis of a handicap or disability, vocational training and placement, and educational training and placement represent a few of the many purposes for administering intelligence tests. Perhaps one of the major aspects of intelligence tests that has served to sustain their popularity is that they do what was intended by Binet and Simon when they developed one of the first intelligence scales many years ago: they predict school achievement better than any other type of measurement instrument. More significantly, it may be that psychologists view these tests as direct measures of mental functioning. In any case, intelligence tests are used extensively for many purposes, and many of these uses in some sense involve the clinical assessment of intellectual functioning.

Keywords

Intelligence Test Computerize Adaptive Testing Fluid Intelligence Adult Intelligence Primary Mental Ability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan S. Kaufman
    • 1
  • Patti L. Harrison
    • 1
  1. 1.Area of Behavioral Studies, College of EducationThe University of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA

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