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Gerontology

  • Rachel Pruchno
  • M. Powell Lawton
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Knowledge regarding the clinical psychology of later life (to be called “clinical geropsychology” for convenience) began, as did most psychological knowledge, with the astute observations of scholars and writers. Subjects for observations must have been very rare, however, as the average length of life in mid-Roman times was 22 years, while during the American Colonial period it was 35.5 years (Dublin, Lotka, & Spiegelman, 1949). Against this standard, the Roman emperors’ mean age of death at 42 seems extraordinary. Thus the conclusion is clear that whoever was observed at really advanced ages constituted a most biased, longevous sample.

Keywords

Mental Health Nursing Home Mental Health Service Personality Disorder Family Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rachel Pruchno
    • 1
  • M. Powell Lawton
    • 1
  1. 1.Polisher Research InstitutePhiladelphia Geriatric CenterPhiladelphiaUSA

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