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Sexual Dysfunctions

A Historical Perspective
  • Douglas R. Hogan
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Sexual dysfunctions are problems that interfere with a person’s ability to engage in, enjoy, or achieve satisfaction from a sexual interaction. The number of specific problems that are classified as sexual dysfunctions and the definitions of these problems vary greatly in the different diagnostic systems that have been used by clinicians and researchers. Currently, most diagnostic systems are based on Kaplan’s (1974, 1979) division of the sexual response cycle into three phases, the desire phase, the excitement phase, and the orgasm phase. Sexual dysfunctions are classified according to which of these three phases is interfered with. The terminology and definitions discussed below are a composite, based on the work of Kaplan (1974, 1979, 1987), the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 1980, 1987), and the multiaxial system developed by Schover, Freidman, Weiler, Heiman, and LoPiccolo (1980, 1982).

Keywords

Sexual Behavior Erectile Dysfunction Sexual Dysfunction Sexual Desire Sexual Arousal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas R. Hogan
    • 1
  1. 1.Private Practice in Clinical PsychologyGarden CityUSA

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