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Sleep-Disordered Breathing Preliminary Natural History and Mortality Results

  • Sonia Ancoli-Israel
  • Melville R. Klauber
  • Robert L. Fell
  • Linda Parker
  • Lynne A. Kenney
  • Richard Willens
Part of the The Plenum Series in Behavioral Psychophysiology and Medicine book series (SSBP)

Abstract

Although the description of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) appeared as far back as 1877 (Lavie, 1984), clinicians first began recognizing it as a serious problem only some thirty years ago (Guilleminault and Dement, 1978). SDB is described as respiratory cessation (apnea) or a decrease in the amplitude of respiration (hypopnea) during sleep. Clinically, there are often hundreds of apneas and hypopneas seen during the night, accompanied by drops in oxygen saturation levels. The apneas and hypopneas are followed by brief arousals (awakenings) that allow respiration to resume. Given this pattern, many clinical patients are unable to sleep and breathe at the same time.

Keywords

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Daytime Sleepiness Sleep Medicine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sonia Ancoli-Israel
    • 1
    • 2
  • Melville R. Klauber
    • 3
  • Robert L. Fell
    • 1
    • 2
  • Linda Parker
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lynne A. Kenney
    • 1
    • 2
  • Richard Willens
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Veterans Affairs Medical CenterSan DiegoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Family and Preventive MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA

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