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Protein and Amino Acid Diagenesis Dating

  • P. E. Hare
  • David W. Von Endt
  • Julie E. Kokis
Part of the Advances in Archaeological and Museum Science book series (AAMS, volume 2)

Abstract

This chapter reviews the general biogeochemical principles underlying the use of various protein and amino acid diagenetic processes as a means of assigning relative and Chronometric ages to various sample materials including bone, shell and teeth. The focus of this discussion is on racemization and epimerization processes and their application to archaeological materials and related Quaternary geological, climatic, or environmental contexts. The factors influencing accuracy and precision of the age estimates based on the measurement of the rates of amino acid racemization and modeling of factors influencing these rates are discussed.

Keywords

Aspartic Acid Land Snail Quaternary Science Review Fossil Shell Fossil Bone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. E. Hare
    • 1
  • David W. Von Endt
    • 2
  • Julie E. Kokis
    • 3
  1. 1.Geophysical LaboratoryCarnegie Institution of Washington, DCUSA
  2. 2.Conservation Analytical LaboratorySmithsonian InstitutionUSA
  3. 3.Geophysical LaboratoryCarnegie Institution of WashingtonUSA

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