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Focus for Education Reform: Building the Home-School Synergism

  • Dorothy Rich

Abstract

Two major questions to be addressed in this chapter are these:

How can the mounting research on the relationship of the home to children’s school success be translated into practical action?

How can we involve the community--all families--meaningfully in the education “action”?

Keywords

Single Parent Parent Involvement Family Involvement Education Reform Home Computer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dorothy Rich
    • 1
  1. 1.The Home and School InstituteUSA

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