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Parent as Teacher: What do We Know?

  • Robert P. Boger
  • Richard A. Richter
  • Beatrice Paolucci

Abstract

The concept of parents as teachers represents a large and rapidly expanding volume of literature. The proliferation of research studies, reanalyses, and evaluations require extensive organization and integration to discover what is said. The problem is not a lack of information, but rather the ability to use the information we have. In addition, as Leichter (1974) has noted, “The family is a different subject for inquiry because it is so much a part of everyone’s experience that it becomes hard to avoid projecting one’s own values, beliefs and attitudes onto the experience of others” (p. 215). All of this nothwithstanding, the considerable face validity engendered by the concept of parents as teachers has been supported by powerful empirical evidence (Bronf enbrenner, 1974; Lazar, 1981) supporting the position that parent involvement in the education of the child improves the effectiveness of that education. What follows is not a comprehensive state-of-the-art paper nor a comprehensive review of the parent as teacher literature. It is, however, an attempt to respond to the literature, particularly integrative summaries, and further, to place these in a context that we interpret to be important to their synthesis. We hope by so doing to place them in proper introductory perspective to provide the foundation for what follows in other chapters of the volume.

Keywords

Parent Involvement Head Start Household Production Reading Achievement Human Ecology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert P. Boger
    • 1
  • Richard A. Richter
    • 1
  • Beatrice Paolucci
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Family and Child Study and the Department of Family and Child EcologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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