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Bilateral and Unilateral Olfactory Sensitivity: Relationship to Handedness and Gender

  • Richard E. Frye
  • Richard L. Doty
  • Paul Shaman

Abstract

Unlike most major sensory systems, the majority of olfactory projections are ipsilateral. Both hemispheres can process olfactory information in a manner analogous to what is seen in other sensory systems, although, as noted below, they may do so differently. Gordon and Sperry (1969) found that patients whose corpus callosum and other forebrain commissures were surgically sectioned could only names odors presented to the left nostril; odors presented to the right nostril could be identified by pointing to an object associated with the smell.

Keywords

Olfactory Function Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Nasal Resistance Olfactory Sensitivity Olfactory Threshold 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard E. Frye
    • 1
    • 2
  • Richard L. Doty
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paul Shaman
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Smell and Taste CenterUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Otorhinolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Statistics, The Wharton SchoolUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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