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Characterization of a Spawning Pheromone from Pacific Herring

  • Joachim Carolsfeld
  • Nancy M. Sherwood
  • Ann L. Kyle
  • Timothy H. Magnus
  • Steven Pleasance
  • Henrik Kreiberg

Abstract

Pacific herring (Clupea harengus p.11asi) spawn synchronously in large schools of several million fish in the near-shore environment, markedly discolouring the surrounding water with suspended milt. This spawning activity has a rapid onset as a school moves inshore. Males appear to initiate spawning in small pockets from which the activity spreads to the rest of the school (Hay, 1985). Spawning continues for several hours in small schools (Hourston and Rosenthal, 1976) and several days in large schools, after wh:.ch the fish move back into deeper waters (Haegele and Schweigert,:985). Without overt behavioural interaction, the spawning female and ma:.e herring deposit gametes on submerged vegetation or other surfaces as trails of sticky eggs or viscous milt (Schaeffer, 1937). Over 20 layers of eggs result in some cases (Haegele and Schweigert, 1985). The deposited milt, together with milt released mid-water, gradually diss:.pates, resulting in the milkiness typical of herring spawning s:.tes. Hay (1985) suggests that high concentrations of milt may inhibit spawning and hence regulate the density of egg deposition.

Keywords

Bioactive Material Taurocholic Acid Steroid Sulfate Pacific Herring Pheromone Candidate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joachim Carolsfeld
    • 1
  • Nancy M. Sherwood
    • 1
  • Ann L. Kyle
    • 2
  • Timothy H. Magnus
    • 2
  • Steven Pleasance
    • 3
  • Henrik Kreiberg
    • 4
  1. 1.Biology DepartmentUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada
  2. 2.Department of AnatomyUniversity of CalgaryCalgary, AlbertaCanada
  3. 3.Institute for Marine BiosciencesHalifaxCanada
  4. 4.Pacific Biological StationNanaimoCanada

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