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Use of a Trigeminal Irritant for Wildlife Management

  • Michael L. Avery
  • David G. Decker
  • Curtis O. Nelms

Abstract

Aversive chemicals have been used for many years to manage wildlife in certain problem situations. A group of compounds that hold particular promise for the management of wild bird species is composed of derivatives of anthranilic acid. These esters, especially methyl anthranilate and dimethyl anthranilate, are very effective avian feeding deterrents and appear to act primarily through nasal trigeminal irritation (Mason et al. 1989). Methyl anthranilate (MA) is attractive as a wildlife management tool because (1) it is relatively inexpensive, (2) it is generally regarded as safe (GRAS-listed) for humans by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (MA is used as a fruit flavoring in many foods and cosmetics), and (3) birds do not seem to habituate to it. The use of MA and related compounds represents a humane, nonlethal approach to the control of problem bird species.

Keywords

Propylene Glycol Olfactory Receptor Anthranilic Acid Fruit Flavoring Wild Bird Species 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael L. Avery
    • 1
  • David G. Decker
    • 1
  • Curtis O. Nelms
    • 1
  1. 1.USDA/APHIS, Denver Wildlife Research CenterFlorida Field StationGainesvilleUSA

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