Advertisement

Sequential Phenotypic Conversion of Renal Epithelial Cells During Neoplastic Development

  • Peter Bannasch
  • Enrique Nogueira
  • Heide Zerban
  • Karin Beck
  • Doris Mayer

Abstract

The discussion on the histogenesis of epithelial kidney tumors started in human pathology about a century ago and remained controversial up to the present. In experimental animals, especially in small rodents, renal tumors have been produced by a variety of chemicals1. Systematic studies of the sequence of cellular changes preceding the appearance of these tumors resulted in a number of interesting observations which did not only elucidate specific problems of renal carcinogenesis but might also contribute important new aspects to the unravelling of neoplastic development in general2.

Keywords

Renal Cell Carcinoma Clear Cell Glycogen Phosphorylase Renal Epithelial Cell Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Y. Hiasa and N. Ito, Experimental induction of renal tumors, Crit. Rev. Toxicol. 17:279 (1987).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    P. Bannasch, Phenotypic cellular changes as indicators of stages during neoplastic development, in: “Theories of Carcinogenesis”, O. H. Iversen, ed., Hemisphere Publishing Corporation, Washington (1988).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    P. Bannasch, U. Schacht and E. Storch, Morphogenese und mikromorphologie epithelialer nierentumoren bei nitrosomorpholin-vergifteten ratten. I. Induktion und histologie der tumoren, Z. Krebsforsch. 81:311 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    P. Bannasch, R. Krech and H. Zerban, Morphogenese und mikromorphologie epithelialer nierentumoren bei nitrosomorpholin-vergifteten ratten. II. Tubuläre glykogenose und die genese von klar-oder acidophilzelligen tumoren, Z. Krebsforsch. 92:63 (1978a).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    P. Bannasch, R. Krech and H. Zerban, Morphogenese und mikromorphologie epithelialer nierentumoren bei nitrosomorpholin-vergifteten ratten, III. Onkocytentubuli und Onkocytome, Z. Krebsforsch. 92:87 (1978b).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    P. Bannasch, D. Mayer and R. Krech, Neoplastische und präneoplastische Veränderungen bei ratten nach einmaliger oraler applikation von N-nitrosomorpholin, J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol. 94:233 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    P. Bannasch, R. Krech and H. Zerban, Morphogenese und mikromorphologie epithelialer nierentumoren bei nitrosomorpholin-vergifteten ratten. IV. Tubuläre läsionen und basophile tumoren, J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol. 98:243 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    P. Bannasch, H. J. Hacker, H. Tsuda and H. Zerban, Aberrant carbohydrate metabolism and metamorphosis during renal carcinogenesis, Advan. Enzyme Regul. 25:279 (1986a).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    R. Krech, H. Zerban and P. Bannasch, Mitochondrial anomalies in renal oncocytes induced in rat by N-nitrosomorpholine, Eur. J. Cell Biol. 25:331 (1981).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    H. Tsuda, H. J. Hacker, H. Katayama, T. Masui, N. Ito and P. Bannasch, Correlative histochemical studies on preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions in the kidney of rats treated with nitrosamines, Virchows Arch. B (Cell Path.) 51:385 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    E. Nogueira and P. Bannasch, Histogenese von onkocytaren und klarzelligen nierentumoren der ratte, Verh. Dtsch. Ges. Path. 71:562 (1987a).Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    E. Nogueira and P. Bannasch, Oncocytic transformation of the rat renal collecting duct epithelium induced by various carcinogens, J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol. 113:S19 (1987b).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    P. Bannasch, H. Zerban and H. J. Hacker, Oncocytoma, kidney, rat, in: “Monographs on Pathology of Laboratory Animals, Urinary System”, T. C. Jones, U. Mohr, and R. D. Hunt, eds., Springer-Verlag, Berlin-Heidelberg-New York (1986b).Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    P. Bannasch and H. Zerban, Renal cell adenoma and carcinoma, in: “Monographs on Pathology of Laboratory Animal, Urinary System”, T. C. Jones, U. Mohr and R. D. Hunt, eds., Springer-Verlag, Berlin-Heidelberg-New York (1986b).Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    W. Thoenes, S. Störkel and H.-J. Rumpelt, Human chromophobe cell renal carcinoma, Virchows Arch. B (Cell Pathol.) 48:207 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    S. Bachmann, T. Sakai and W. Kriz, Nephron and collecting duct structure in the kidney, rat, in: “Monographs on Pathology of Laboratory Animals, Urinary System”, T. C. Jones, U. Mohr and R. D. Hunt, eds., Springer-Verlag, Berlin-Heidelberg-New York-Tokyo (1986).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    S. Hagen, Zur zellproliferation der rattenniere unter N-nitrosomorpholin in verschiedenen konzentrationen. Autoradiographische Untersuchungen mit 3H-thymidin, Inaug. Diss., Würzburg (1977).Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    E. Nogueira, Rat renal carcinogenesis after chronic simultaneous exposure to lead acetate and N-nitrosodiethylamine, Virchows Arch. B (Cell Path.) 53:365 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    P. Mao and J. J. Molnar, The fine structure and histochemistry of lead induced renal tumors in rats, Am. J. Pathol. 50:571 (1967).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    G. C. Hard and W. H. Butler, Ultrastructural aspects of renal adenocarcinoma induced in the rat by dimethylnitrosamine, Cancer Res. 31:366 (1971a).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    G. C. Hard and W. H. Butler, Morphogenesis of epithelial neoplasms induced in the rat kidney by dimethylnitrosamine, Cancer Res. 31:1496 (1971b).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    A. R. McGiven and H. J. Ireton, Renal epithelial dysplasia and neoplasia in rats given dimethylnitrosamine, J. Pathol. 108:187 (1972).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Z. Hruban, Y. Mochizuki, H. P. Morris and A. Slesers, Ultrastructure of Morris renal tumors, J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 50:1487 (1973).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    L. P. Merkow, S. M. Epstein, M. Slifkin and M. Pardo, The ultrastructure of renal neoplasms induced by aflatoxin Bl, Cancer Res. 33:1608 (1973).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    W. Gusek, Die Ultrastruktur cycasin-induzierter nierenadenome, Virchows Arch. A (Path. Anat.) 365:221 (1975).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    J. H. Dees, M. D. Reuber and B. F. Trump, Adenocarcinoma of the kidney. I. Ultrastructure of renal adenocarcinomas induced in rats by N-(4′-fluoro-4-biphenylyl)-acetamide, J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 57:779 (1976).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    N. Ito, J. Johno, M. Marugami, Y. Konishi and Y. Hiasa, Histopathological and autoradiographic studies on kidney tumors induced by N-nitroso-dimethylamine in rat, Gann 57:595 (1966).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    G. Jasmin and J. L. Riopelle, Transplantation de trois tumeurs rénales induites chez le rat par la diméthylnitrosamine, Int. J. Cancer 4:299 (1969).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    B. M. Heatfield, D. E. Hinton and B. F. Trump, Adenocarcinoma of the kidney, II. Enzyme histochemistry of renal adenocarcinomas induced in rats by N-(4′-fluoro-4-biphenyl)acetamide, J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 57:795 (1976).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    H. Hamperl, Onkocyten und Onkocytome, Virchows Arch. A (Path. Anat.) 335:452 (1962).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    J. D. Van der Walt, H. A. S. Reid, R. A. Risdon and H. F. Shaw, Renal oncocytoma. A review of the literature and report of an unusual multicentric case, Virchows Arch. A (Path. Anat.) 398:291 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    J. N. Eble and M. T. Hull, Morphologic features of renal oncocytoma: A light and electron microscopic study, Hum. Pathol. 15:1054 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    M. M. Lieber, Renal oncocytoma, in: “Cancer of the Kidney”, N. Javadpour, ed., Georg Thieme Verlag, New York (1984).Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    H. Zerban, E. Nogueira, G. Riedasch and P. Bannasch, Renal oncocytoma: origin from the collecting duct, Virchows Arch. B (Cell Path.) 52:375 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    J. S. O’Brien, Tay-Sachs’ disease and juvenile GM2-gangliosidosis, in: “Lysosomes and Storage Diseases”, H. G. Hers and F. van Hoof, eds., Academic Press, New York-London (1973).Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    U. Sandhoff and K. Harzer, Total hexosaminidase deficiency in Tay-Sachs’ disease (variant O), in: “Lysosomes and Storage Diseases” H. G. Hers and F. van Hoof, eds., Academic Press, New York-London (1973).Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    H. Zerban, H. J. Hacker, H. Palmtag and P. Bannasch, Cytomorphological and cytochemical analysis of renal cell carcinoma, Path. Res. Pract. 178:174 (1983).Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    C. Oberling, M. Rivière and F. Haguenau, Ultrastructure des épithéliomas à cellules claires du rein (Hypernéphrornes ou tumeurs de Grawitz) et son implication pour l’histogenèse de ces tumeurs, Bull. Assn. Franc. Cancer 46:356 (1959).Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    R. Seljelid and J. L. E. Ericsson, An electron microscopic study of mitochondria in renal clear cell carcinoma, J. Microscopie 4:759 (1965).Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    M. Tannenbaum, Ultrastructural pathology of human renal cell tumors, in: “Pathology Annual”, vol. 6, S. C. Sommers, ed., Butterworth, London (1971).Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    G. Heber, F. J. Goulding, R. C. Jackson and J. N. Eble, Biochemistry of human renal cell carcinoma, in: “Characterization and Treatment of Human Tumours”, W. Davies and K. R. Harrap, eds., Exerpta Medica (1978).Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    G. Weber, Enzymic programs of human renal adenocarcinoma, in: “Renal Adenocarcinoma”, G. Sufrin and S. A. Beckley, eds., UICC Publications, Geneva (1980).Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    D. Mayer and P. Bannasch, Activity of glycogen synthase and phosphorylase and glucose 6-phosphate content in renal clear cell carcinomas, J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol, in press (1988).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Bannasch
    • 1
  • Enrique Nogueira
    • 1
  • Heide Zerban
    • 1
  • Karin Beck
    • 1
  • Doris Mayer
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Experimentelle PathologieDeutsches KrebsforschungszentrumHeidelbergGermany

Personalised recommendations