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The Superior Temporal Polysensory Region in Monkeys

  • Catherine G. Cusick
Part of the Cerebral Cortex book series (CECO, volume 12)

Abstract

This chapter will review the progressive refinement of the concept of superior temporal polysensory (STP) cortex in macaque monkeys, describe the different organizational schemes in current use, and highlight a number of unresolved issues. Studies of the STP region have been limited by the difficulty of reconciling disparate physiological findings, suggesting, on the one hand, a role in visuospatial functions or eye movement control, and on the other, contributions to complex visual recognition functions. It is perhaps premature to assign STP cortex to either the dorsal or ventral stream of visual processing, thought to be crucial for visuospatial functions and object recognition, respectively, and the potential integrative functions of this region should not be ignored.

Keywords

Superior Colliculus Superior Temporal Gyrus Inferior Parietal Lobule Posterior Parietal Cortex Macaque Monkey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine G. Cusick
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy SL49Tulane School of MedicineNew OrleansUSA

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