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Liver Cysteine Proteinases in Macrophage Depression Induced by Gadolinium Chloride

  • T. Korolenko
  • I. Svechnikova
  • K. Urazgaliyev
  • G. Vakulin
  • S. Djanaeva
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 421)

Abstract

Liver lysosomal enzymes during macrophage depression (gadolinium chloride, 7 mg/kg, intravenously) and macrophage stimulation (zymosan, 100 mg/kg, intravenously) have been studied. It was shown that gadolinium chloride treatment of rats reduced the rate of carbon particles phagocytosis at 24 and 48 h after the single administration. Decreased endocytic capacity of Kupffer cells was confirmed also by electron microscopy. Gadolinium chloride induced labilization of liver lysosomes (increased free activity of cathepsins B and L): there was no changes of specific activity of liver cysteine proteinases (24 h). Gadolinium chloride prevented death of rats after administration of non-sonicated particular zymosan particles, resulting to 70% survival, compare with the 17% survival in group with zymosan alone. We can summarize that macrophages depression by gadolinium chloride abolish symptoms of inflammation in zymosan-model, influencing on cysteine proteinases of Kupffer cells.

Keywords

Kupffer Cell Free Activity Spleen Weight Liver Macrophage Macrophage Stimulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Korolenko
    • 1
  • I. Svechnikova
    • 1
  • K. Urazgaliyev
    • 1
  • G. Vakulin
    • 2
  • S. Djanaeva
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Cellular BiochemistryInstitute of Physiology RAMSNovosibirskRussia
  2. 2.Novosibirsk Medical InstituteNovosibirskRussia

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