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Cell Fusion pp 497-520 | Cite as

Chemically Induced Fusion of Plant Protoplasts

  • James A. Saunders
  • George W. Bates

Abstract

In recent years, the fusion of plant protoplasts has become an important mechanism of transferring genetic information between sexually incompatible species. The potential totipotency of plant culture systems together with the development of protoplast isolation and fusion procedures has increased the use of somatic hybridization as a viable tool of molecular biologists.

Keywords

Somatic Hybrid Cell Fusion Protoplast Fusion Mesophyll Protoplast Protoplast Isolation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • James A. Saunders
    • 1
  • George W. Bates
    • 2
  1. 1.Germplasm Quality and Enhancement LaboratoryUSDA Plant Genetics and Germplasm InstituteBeltsvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biological Science and Institute of Molecular BiophysicsFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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