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Short-Term Psychotherapy for Chronic Insomnia

  • Andrew J. Borson
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Can short-term psychotherapy be used to treat chronic insomnia? I believe that in many cases it can, with minimal use of behavioral or pharmacological interventions, and with complete eradication of the insomnia problem.

Keywords

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Chronic Insomnia Emotional Conflict Insomnia Patient Ruminative Thinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended Readings

  1. Kales, A., Kales, J. D. (1984). Evaluation and treatment of insomnia. New York: Oxford University Press. This book focuses on common psychodynamic factors underlying chronic insomnia, as well as some of the typical resistances encountered in insomniac patients. This text is quite useful in helping a clinician develop a formulation based on underlying emotional issues, although the treatment approach advocated is different from mine and follows a more traditional psychoanalytic model.Google Scholar
  2. MacKinnon, R. A., Michels, R. (1971). The psychiatric interview in clinical practice. Philadelphia: Saunders. This is a brief textbook on understanding the psychodynamics of various personality types and symptom complaints, which can be quite valuable in orienting a therapist to the underlying emotional issues likely to be key to effective problem resolution.Google Scholar
  3. Sifneos, P. E. (1987). Short-term dynamic psychotherapy: Evaluation and technique (2nd ed.). New York: Plenum Press. This book provides an excellent model for the use of psychodynamic formula- tions in an active and short-term psychotherapy that focuses on helping the patient recognize and break through emotional blocks and conflicts. While there is no direct application to insomnia, the form of treatment I describe is derived in part from the Sifneos model.Google Scholar

References

  1. Bootzin, R. R., Nicassio, P. M. (1978). Behavioral treatments for insomnia. In M. Hersen, R. Eisler, P. Miller (Eds.), Progress in behavior modification (Vol. 6). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bruch, H. (1974). Learning psychotherapy: Rationale and ground rules. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Fromm-Reichmann, E (1960). Principles of intensive psychotherapy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  4. Kales, A., Kales, J. D. (1984). Evaluation and treatment of insomnia. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Lacks, P. (1987). Behavioral treatment for persistent insomnia. Oxford: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  6. MacKinnon, R. A., Michels, R. (1971). The psychiatric interview in clinical practice. Philadelphia: Saunders.Google Scholar
  7. Sifneos, E. E. (1972). Short-term psychotherapy and emotional crises. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Sifneos, P. E. (1987). Short-term dynamic psychotherapy: Evaluation and technique (2nd ed.). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  9. Spielman, A. J., Suskin, P., Thorpy, M. J. (1987). Treatment of chronic insomnia by restriction of time in bed. Sleep, W, 45–56.Google Scholar
  10. White, R. W. (1948). The abnormal personality. New York: Ronald Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. White, R. W. (1963). Ego and reality in psychoanalytic theory. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew J. Borson
    • 1
  1. 1.Sleep Disorders Center, Crozer-Chester Medical CenterChesterUSA

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