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Insomnia in the Older Adult

  • Judith Flaxman
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Nearly half the adults between the ages of 65 and 79 (45 percent) report some difficulty with insomnia (Bootzin & Engle-Friedman, 1987). Additionally, nearly half of 65-to-74-year-olds use hypnotics regularly (Rosenberg,1984). This percentage is even higher for the institutionalized elderly. This high use of hypnotics is a serious problem for older adults because they often use multiple medications and do not metabolize drugs efficiently.

Keywords

Sleep Disorder Sleep Problem Relaxation Training Sleep Hygiene Cardiac Rehabilitation Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith Flaxman
    • 1
  1. 1.Illinois School of Professional PsychologyChicagoUSA

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