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Child Sexual Abuse

  • David J. Kolko
  • Janet Stauffer

Abstract

Child sexual abuse (CSA) has received considerable national attention, owing, in part, to accumulating evidence as to its prevalence, patterns, severity, and long-term effects (see Finkelhor, 1984). Studies of the incidence of CSA have estimated that more than 80% of the victims are female and that perpetrators are generally known to their victims (Alter-Reid, Gibbs, Lachenmeyer, Sigal, & Massoth, 1986). The short-term and long-term effects of CSA have been documented with increasing regularity (Browne & Finkelhor, 1986; Finkelhor & Browne, 1985; Lusk & Waterman, 1986; Mrazek, 1983). Browne and Finkelhor (1986) have conceptualized the traumatic impact of CSA in terms of a broad range of physical and psychopathological symptoms that reflect traumatic sexualization, betrayal, stigmatization, and powerlessness.

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Child Abuse Child Sexual Abuse Family Violence Male Victim 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • David J. Kolko
    • 1
  • Janet Stauffer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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