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Uptake and Biological Effects of the Carborane Based Boron Compounds DAC-1 and DAAC-1

  • Pär Olsson
  • Peter Lindström
  • Nina Tilly
  • Melissa Black
  • Jonas Malmqvist
  • Jean Pettersson
  • Stefan Sjöberg
  • Jörgen Carlsson

Abstract

The amount of boron needed for successful treatment of tumour cells has been calculated to be about 109 10B-atoms when the boron is in the cytoplasm or 108 10B-atoms when located in the cell nucleus.1,2 An amount of 108 10B-atoms in the cell nucleus gives a boron dependent dose of about 2 Gy high-LET irradiation if a reasonable thermal neutron fluence (about 5×1012 n/cm2) is applied2 and this gives most likely a valuable therapeutic effect. An amount of 108 10B-atoms per cell corresponds to an average 10B concentration in the cells of about 1.5–2.0 ppm (μg boron/g tissue) if the cell diameter is about 10 μm. If the average cellular concentration is significantly above 10 ppm, then there is a good chance to inactivate cell division by boron dependent captures.

Keywords

Glioma Cell Colon Carcinoma Malignant Glioma Boron Concentration Boron Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pär Olsson
    • 1
  • Peter Lindström
    • 1
  • Nina Tilly
    • 1
  • Melissa Black
    • 1
  • Jonas Malmqvist
    • 2
  • Jean Pettersson
    • 3
  • Stefan Sjöberg
    • 2
  • Jörgen Carlsson
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences Department of Radiation SciencesUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden
  2. 2.Department of Organic ChemistryUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden
  3. 3.Department of Analytical Chemistry Institute of ChemistryUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden

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