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Assessment of Radiation Induced Damage of Mouse Brain Using 18F-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose and 99mTc-Hexamethylpropylene Amine Oxine

A Feasible Study for Positron Emission Tomography-Preliminary Results
  • Yoshinao Abe
  • Shuiti Ono
  • Jutaro Takahashi
  • Tachio Sato
  • Hiroshi Fukuda

Abstract

The most severe radiation-induced brain damage is brain necrosis. Clinically, it is difficult to differentiate between brain necrosis and recurrent brain tumor1. Radiation brain necrosis is a terminal stage of the brain damage. However, it is not well known the mechanisms underlying the process that produce the brain necrosis after irradiation: i.e. how glucose metabolism and blood flow distribution change after irradiation. We studied the uptake of 18F-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and 99mTc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxine (HMPAO) in the irradiated brain of the mouse regarding glucose and blood flow distribution, respectively. This study is a feasible for positron emission tomography.

Keywords

Positron Emission Tomography Uptake Ratio Brain Damage Blood Flow Distribution Recurrent Brain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    G. Di Chiro et al. Cerebral necrosis after radiation therapy and/or intraarterial chemotherapy for brain tumors: PET and neurologic studies. AJNR 8: 1083–1091, 1987.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    W. Calvo et al. Time and dose related changes in the white matter of the rat brain after single doses of X-rays. Brit. J. Radiol. 61: 1043–1052, 1988.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshinao Abe
    • 1
  • Shuiti Ono
    • 1
  • Jutaro Takahashi
    • 1
  • Tachio Sato
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Fukuda
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Institute of Development, Aging, and CancerTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan

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