Advertisement

Neutron Capture Therapy with Gd-DTPA in Tumor-Bearing Rats

  • V. F. Khokhlov
  • P. N. Yashkin
  • D. I. Silin
  • E. S. Djorova
  • R. Lawaczeck

Abstract

Gd-DTPA dimeglumine (Magnevist®) is widely used as contrast medium in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is especially helpful for the delineation of brain tumors with an injured blood-brain barrier’. The dianion [Gd-DTPA]2− diffuses into the tumorous tissue and due to the large magnetic moment of the Gd3+-ion leads to a shortening of the water relaxation times’ and, consequently, to changes of the MRI signal intensities2. A number of pharmacologically well-tolerated Gd-complexes are clinically available or under clinical development. In addition to its diagnostic value, 157Gd with a natural abundance of 15.7% has the highest cross-section (255 000 barn (=10−24 cm2)) for thermal neutrons of all stable isotopes. Natural Gd has an average cross-section of 48 800 barn. After neutron capture the excited Gd-nuclei relax via the emission of photons with energies up to 7.9 MeV and a cascade of conversion and Auger electrons. Therefore, Gd-complexes have been suggested as agents for neutron capture therapy (NCT)3–6 and NCT effects of Gd-complexes have been studied in phantoms’, on the DNA level’, and in both in vitro and in vivo systems9–13 A therapeutic gain has been demonstrated experimentally for extracellular Gd-complexes9–13 although the discussion on the contributions of prompt γ’s or electrons to the therapeutic effect is not yet settled. In the following we report on experiments performed with a rat tumor model and administration of Gd-DTPA prior to irradiation with epithermal neutrons.

Keywords

Epithermal Neutron Post Irradiation Capture Reaction Therapeutic Gain Large Magnetic Moment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    G. Wolf, K.R. Burnett, E.J. Goldstein, and P.M. Joseph, Contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, in “Magnetic Resonance Annual”, H.Y. Kressel, ed., Raven Press, New York, 1985, pp. 231–266.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    H.-J. Weinmann, R.C. Brasch, W.R. Press, G.E. Wesbey, Characteristics of Gadolinium-DTPA Complex: a potential NMR contrast agent. AJR 142: 619–624, 1984.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    R.F. Martin, G. D’Cunha, M. Pardee, B.J. Allen, Induction of double-strand breaks following neutron capture by DNA-bound I57Gd. Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 54: 205–208, 1988.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    R.M. Brugger, J.A. Shih, Evaluation of Gadolinium-157 as a neutron therapy agent. Strahlenther Onkol. 165: 153–156, 1989.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Y. S. Ryabukhin, Integrated approach in the planning of neutron capture therapy. Strahlenther Onkol. 165: 158–162, 1989.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    J.A. Shih, R.M. Brugger, Gadolinium as a neutron capture therapy agen., Med. Phys. 19: 733–744, 1992.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    J.T. Masiakowski, J.L. Horton, and L.J. Peters, Gadolinium neutron capture therapy for brain tumors: a computer study. Med. Phys. 19: 1–8, 1992.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    T. Matsumoto, Transport calculations of depth-dose distributions for gadolinium neutron capture therapy. Phys. Med. Biol. 37: 155–162, 1992PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Y. Akine, N. Tokita, T. Matsumoto, H. Oyama, S. Egawa, O. Aizawa, Radiation effect of gadolinium-neutron capture reactions on the survival of chinese hamster cells. Strahlenther. Onkol. 166: 831–833 1990.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    M. Takagaki, Y. Oda, S. Miyatake, H. Kikuchi, T. Kobayashi, K. Kanda, Y. Ujeno, Killing effects of gadolinium neutron capture reactions on brain tumors, in “Progress in Neutron Capture Therapy for Cancer’’, B.J. Allen et al., eds. Plenum Press, New York, 1992, pp. 407–410.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Y. Akine, N. Tokita, T. Matsumoto, H. Oyama, O. Aizawa, Gadolinium-neutron capture reactions: a radiobiological assay, in ’Progress in Neutron Capture Therapy for Cancer“. B.J. Allen et al., eds., Plenum Press, New York, 1992, pp. 361–363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Y. Akine, N. Tokita, K. Tokuuye, M. Satoh, T. Kobayashi, K. Kanda, Electron-equivalent dose for the effect of Gadolinium neutron capture therapy on the growth of subcutaneously-inoculated Ehrlich tumor cells in mice. Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol. 23: N3, 145–148, 1993.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Y. Akine, N. Tokita, K. Tokuuye, M. Satoh, H. Churei, C. LePechoux, T. Kobayashi, and K. Kanda, Suppression of rabbit YX-2 subcutaneous tumor growth by Gadolinium Neutron Capture Therapy. Jpn. J. Cancer Res. 84: 841–843, 1993.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    T.J. Vogl, M.G. Mack, M. Juergens, C. Bergman, G. Grevers, T.F. Jacobsen, J. Lissner, R. Felix, Skull base tumors: gadodiamide injection-enhanced MR imaging–drop-out effect in the early enhancement pattern of paragangliomas versus different tumors. Radiology 188: 339–346, 1993.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. F. Khokhlov
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. N. Yashkin
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. I. Silin
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. S. Djorova
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Lawaczeck
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of BiophysicsMinistry of Public HealthMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Institut für Diagnostikforschung and Schering AGContrast Media ResearchBerlinGermany

Personalised recommendations