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Boron MRI in a Tumor Bearing Canine Model

  • Martin P. Schweizer
  • Kenneth M. Bradshaw
  • J. Rock Hadley
  • Richard Tippets
  • Peng-Peng Zhu Tang
  • Gary H. Glover
  • M. Peter Heilbrun
  • Suzanne Johnson
  • Shonn P. Hendee

Abstract

Over the past several years, we have been involved in the development of a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for quantifying boron drug pharmacokinetics in tumor and other tissues of the canine head1–3. The underlying aims for this research are to provide a method to evaluate the suitability of boron compounds and to provide a potential drug prescreen as an aid to BNCT dosimetry calculations to be used in patient treatment planning.

Keywords

Inductively Couple Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy Inductively Couple Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technique Blood Brain Barrier Damage Proton Image 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin P. Schweizer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Kenneth M. Bradshaw
    • 1
    • 4
    • 6
  • J. Rock Hadley
    • 1
    • 4
    • 6
  • Richard Tippets
    • 5
  • Peng-Peng Zhu Tang
    • 1
  • Gary H. Glover
    • 7
  • M. Peter Heilbrun
    • 5
  • Suzanne Johnson
    • 1
  • Shonn P. Hendee
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of RadiologyUniversity of UtahSalt LakeUSA
  2. 2.BioengineeringUniversity of UtahSalt LakeUSA
  3. 3.Medicinal ChemistryUniversity of UtahSalt LakeUSA
  4. 4.Electrical EngineeringUniversity of UtahSalt LakeUSA
  5. 5.NeurosurgeryUniversity of UtahSalt LakeUSA
  6. 6.Neutron TechnologyBoiseUSA
  7. 7.Department of RadiologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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