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Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption (BBB-D) in Rats

A Technique To Enhance Tumor Boron Uptake
  • David E. Carpenter
  • Weilian Yang
  • Rolf F. Barth
  • Benjamin Ling
  • Michael Castor
  • Joseph H. Goodman

Abstract

Delivery of chemotherapeutic agents or radiation sensitizers to brain neoplasms in amounts sufficient for efficacious therapy remains a continuing challenge. One of the obstacles to be overcome is the inability of large molecules to cross the blood-brain barrier in cerebral capillaries and the blood-tumor barrier in tumor itself. For BNCT to be successful, it is essential that sufficient amounts of boron be delivered to tumors, particularly to disseminated tumor cells at some distance from the main tumor mass. Blood-brain barrier disruption (BBB-D) has been proposed by us (W. Yang, et al., these proceedings) as a means of enhancing compound delivery. We now describe a surgical procedure in rats for BBB-D followed by intracarotid injection of boron compounds and assessment of the degree of disruption.

Keywords

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Disseminate Tumor Cell Boron Compound Boron Level Cerebral Capillary 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • David E. Carpenter
    • 2
  • Weilian Yang
    • 1
  • Rolf F. Barth
    • 1
  • Benjamin Ling
    • 3
  • Michael Castor
    • 3
  • Joseph H. Goodman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PathologyThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Division of NeurosurgeryThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  3. 3.College of MedicineThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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